Resources by Condition

Links provided on this page are for reference and informational purposes only

 

Hemophilia

Hemophilia is usually an inherited bleeding disorder in which the blood does not clot properly. This can lead to spontaneous bleeding as well as bleeding following injuries or surgery. Blood contains many proteins called clotting factors that can help to stop bleeding. People with hemophilia have low levels of either factor VIII (8) or factor IX (9). The severity of hemophilia that a person has is determined by the amount of factor in the blood. The lower the amount of the factor, the more likely it is that bleeding will occur which can lead to serious health problems.

In rare cases, a person can develop hemophilia later in life.  The majority of cases involve middle-aged or elderly people, or young women who have recently given birth or are in the later stages of pregnancy.  This condition often resolves with appropriate treatment.

Source: Centers for Disease Control

CDC: Hemophilia

The Mayo Clinic: Hemophilia

National Hemophilia Foundation

Hemophilia Federation of America

 

Hepatitis

Hepatitis C is a liver infection caused by the Hepatitis C virus (HCV). Hepatitis C is a blood-borne virus. Today, most people become infected with the Hepatitis C virus by sharing needles or other equipment to inject drugs. For some people, hepatitis C is a short-term illness but for 70%–85% of people who become infected with Hepatitis C, it becomes a long-term, chronic infection. Chronic Hepatitis C is a serious disease than can result in long-term health problems, even death. The majority of infected persons might not be aware of their infection because they are not clinically ill. There is no vaccine for Hepatitis C. The best way to prevent Hepatitis C is by avoiding behaviors that can spread the disease, especially injecting drugs.

Hepatitis Ahepatitis B, and hepatitis C are liver infections caused by three different viruses. Although each can cause similar symptoms, they are spread in different ways and can affect the liver differently. Hepatitis A is usually a short-term infection. Hepatitis B and hepatitis C can also begin as short-term infections but in some people, the virus remains in the body, and causes chronic (lifelong) infection. There are vaccines to prevent hepatitis A and hepatitis B; however, there is no vaccine for hepatitis C.

Source: Centers for Disease Control

 

CDC – Hepatitis C

The Liver Foundation

HCV Advocate

Hepatitis Central

Liver Health Connection

Hepatitis Foundation International

 

HIV

HIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus. It is the virus that can lead to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome or AIDS if not treated. Unlike some other viruses, the human body can’t get rid of HIV completely, even with treatment. So once you get HIV, you have it for life.HIV attacks the body’s immune system, specifically the CD4 cells (T cells), which help the immune system fight off infections. Untreated, HIV reduces the number of CD4 cells (T cells) in the body, making the person more likely to get other infections or infection-related cancers. Over time, HIV can destroy so many of these cells that the body can’t fight off infections and disease. These opportunistic infections or cancers take advantage of a very weak immune system and signal that the person has AIDS, the last stage of HIV infection.

 

No effective cure currently exists, but with proper medical care, HIV can be controlled. The medicine used to treat HIV is called antiretroviral therapy or ART.  If people with HIV take ART as prescribed, their viral load (amount of HIV in their blood) can become undetectable. If it stays undetectable, they can live long, healthy lives and have effectively no risk of transmitting HIV to an HIV-negative partner through sex. Before the introduction of ART in the mid-1990s, people with HIV could progress to AIDS in just a few years. Today, someone diagnosed with HIV and treated before the disease is far advanced can live nearly as long as someone who does not have HIV.

Source: Centers for Disease Control

CDC – HIV

POZ – HIV Basics

AIDSinfo.gov

Directory of AIDS Drug Assistance Programs

HIV Thrive

The Tribe Wellness Community

 

Mental Health

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

1-800-273-8255

Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel, and act. It also helps determine how we handle stress, relate to others, and make healthy choices. Mental health is important at every stage of life, from childhood and adolescence through adulthood.

Although the terms are often used interchangeably, poor mental health and mental illness are not the same things. A person can experience poor mental health and not be diagnosed with a mental illness. Likewise, a person diagnosed with a mental illness can experience periods of physical, mental, and social well-being.Mental and physical health are equally important components of overall health.

Mental illness, especially depression, increases the risk for many types of physical health problems, particularly long-lasting conditions like stroke, type 2 diabetes, and heart disease. Similarly, the presence of chronic conditions can increase the risk for mental illness.

Source: Centers for Disease Control

CDC: Mental Health

The Mayo Clinic: Mental Health

MentalHealth.gov

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

National Institute of Mental Health

 

Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis is a chronic, unpredictable disease of the central nervous system (CNS), which is made up of the brain, spinal cord and optic nerves. It is thought to be an immune-mediated disorder, in which the immune system incorrectly attacks healthy tissue in the CNS.

In multiple sclerosis, damage in the central nervous system (CNS) interferes with the transmission of nerve signals between the brain and spinal cord and other parts of the body.

Most people are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, although children and older adults may develop it.

Source: National Multiple Sclerosis Society

 

The Mayo Clinic: Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple Sclerosis Foundation

National Multiple Sclerosis Society

Multiple Sclerosis Association of America

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

 

Oncology

All cancers begin in the body’s cells. Normal cells grow and divide to produce more cells as older cells die off. This keeps the body healthy. However, if the genetic material (DNA) of a cell is damaged or changed, the abnormal cells can invade other tissues. New cells form when the body does not need them or old cells don’t die when they should. These cancer cells can spread through the blood and lymph systems to other parts of the body. The extra cells form a mass of tissue called a growth or tumor.

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) defines cancer as a group of more than 100 related but separate diseases. Cancer is categorized by where the disease begins in the body and not by where it has spread. Here are the main categories of cancer:

  • Carcinoma begins in the skin or tissues that line or cover internal organs.
  • Sarcoma begins in bone, cartilage, fat, muscle, blood vessels or other connective or supportive tissue.
  • Leukemia starts in blood-forming tissue, such as the bone marrow, and causes abnormal blood cells to be produced.
  • Lymphoma and myeloma begin in the cells of the immune system.
  • Central nervous system cancers begin in the tissues of the brain and spinal cord.

Not all tumors are cancerous. They can be benign (noncancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Cells in malignant tumors are abnormal and divide without control or order. They metastasize or spread and destroy the tissue around them. Cancer cells spread through the blood and lymph systems.

Source: livestrong.org

CDC: Oncology

American Cancer Society

Cancer Support Community

Cutaneous Lymphoma Foundation

Leukemia and Lymphoma Society

Livestrong Foundation

Lymphoma Research Foundation

Lymphoma Research Foundation

Onco Link

The Oncofertility Consortium

 

Psoriasis

Psoriasis is a chronic autoimmune skin disease that speeds up the growth cycle of skin cells that causes patches of thick red skin and silvery scales. Patches are typically found on the elbows, knees, scalp, lower back, face, palms, and soles of feet, but can affect other places (fingernails, toenails, and mouth). The most common type of psoriasis is called plaque psoriasis.
Psoriatic arthritis is an inflammatory type of arthritis that eventually occurs in 10% to 20% of people with psoriasis. It is different from more common types of arthritis (such as osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis) and is thought to be related to the underlying problem of psoriasis.

Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis are sometimes considered together as psoriatic disease.

Anyone can get psoriasis. It occurs mostly in adults, but children can also get it. Men and women seem to have equal risk.

Psoriasis is not contagious. This means you cannot get psoriasis from contact (e.g., touching skin patches) with someone who has it.

Source: Centers for Disease Control

 

CDC: Psoriasis

The Mayo Clinic: Psoriasis

National Psoriasis Foundation

NIAMSD

Medline Plus: Psoriasis

 

Rheumatology

Rheumatoid arthritis, or RA, is an autoimmune and inflammatory disease, which means that your immune system attacks healthy cells in your body by mistake, causing inflammation (painful swelling) in the affected parts of the body.

RA mainly attacks the joints, usually many joints at once. RA commonly affects joints in the hands, wrists, and knees. In a joint with RA, the lining of the joint becomes inflamed, causing damage to joint tissue. This tissue damage can cause long-lasting or chronic pain, unsteadiness (lack of balance), and deformity (misshapenness).

RA can also affect other tissues throughout the body and cause problems in organs such as the lungs, heart, and eyes.

Source: Centers for Disease Control

 

CDC: Rheumatology

The Mayo Clinic: Rheumatology

Arthritis Foundation

Rheumatoid Arthritis Support Network

NIAMSD

American College of Rheumatology

 

Solid Organ Transplant

Organ donation is the process of surgically removing an organ or tissue from one person (the organ donor) and placing it into another person (the recipient). Transplantation is necessary because the recipient’s organ has failed or has been damaged by disease or injury.
Organ transplantation is one of the great advances in modern medicine. Unfortunately, the need for organ donors is much greater than the number of people who actually donate. Every day in the United States, 21 people die waiting for an organ and more than 120,048 (www.unos.org, Nov. 1, 2016) men, women, and children await life-saving organ transplants.

Organs that can be transplanted include:

  • Liver
  • Kidney
  • Pancreas
  • Heart
  • Lung
  • Intestine
  • Skin
  • Bone
  • Bone marrow
  • Heart valves

Source: Centers for Disease Control

American Transplant Foundation

American Heart Association

National Kidney Foundation

American Liver Foundation

Lung Transplant Foundation